FDNY Celebrates 100 Years of Woodside's Engine 292

The Patch - November 04, 2018

by Jon Cronin, Patch Staff

"The one constant of this neighborhood, every single day and night, has been this company," said FDNY Commissioner Daniel Nigro.

WOODSIDE, QUEENS — The FDNY's top brass and firefighters retired and active came out Thursday to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Engine 292 on Queens Boulevard in Woodside.

"The one constant of this neighborhood, every single day and night, has been this company," said FDNY Commissioner Daniel Nigro.

Looking out among a sea of retired and active firefighters in their dress uniforms, he added, "This sounds like a simple job, but it is quite complicated to execute."

Nigro spoke of the decades of service the company has provided to the community since 1918. He then presented the Engine 292's Captain James Miller with a plaque commemorating the firehouse's century of service.

The firehouse opened just as the country had just entered World War I and parts of Queens County were still farmland. Nigro pointed out that, at the time, firefighters' only job was to battle a blaze. They did not have the equipment they have today and were not trained in to medically assist the victims of the fire they battled.

Decades later, the company was involved in the 1992 plane crash of Flight 405 near LaGuardia Airport, FDNY Chief of Operation John Sudnik recalled. Some 27 people were killed in the crash.

John Amadeo, who retired after 30 years from the FDNY in 2003 and served five years at Engine 292, said that technology changed so much throughout his career, "it was like coming out of the stone age." He noted that firefighters were not required to be trained in emergency medical service until the mid-1990s.

Liam Guilfoyle, the Uniformed Fire Officers Association's captain representative, started his career at Engine 292. He said he shared his first day with the engine's truck driver, who was so excited to be driving, he didn't give Guilfoyle time to get on the truck.

"I will never forget the friendships I made here 20 years ago," Guilfoyle said.

State Assemblyman Brian Barnwell asked the crowd, "How many lives have been saved by this company since 1918? I think that puts everything in perspective."