NYPD Officer Fatally Shot While Sitting Inside Police Vehicle in the Bronx, Suspect Killed

NY Daily News - July 05, 2017

by Rocco Parascandola, John Annese, Adam Shrier, Denis Slattery, Nicole Hensley

An NYPD officer shot while sitting in a police vehicle in the Bronx has died, authorities said early Wednesday.

The slain officer was identified as Miosotis Familia, 48, a 12-year veteran of the police force. She was assigned to the 46th Precinct.

Two cops gunned down Familia’s alleged assailant during an exchange of fire after he blasted the mobile command post parked near E. 183rd St. and Creston Ave. around 12:30 a.m., according to police sources and Commissioner James O'Neill.

Surveillance footage shows the suspected 34-year-old shooter marching toward the command post “with purpose,” the source said.

O’Neill said the gunman fired one round, striking Familia in the head as she was wrapping up her shift in the Fordham Heights neighborhood.

The cop’s partner frantically screamed into his police radio for help.

“Shots fired!” the officer can be heard shouting moments after the gunfire rang out.

“I need a f-----g bus! 10-85 10-85! My partner’s shot! My partner’s shot! My partner’s shot! Hurry up central!”

Familia was critically wounded and rushed to St. Barnabas Hospital, where she died. A line of police saluted the fallen officer outside the hospital as she was escorted to the medical examiner.

A police source said another officer was also treated at the hospital for trauma.

“It is obvious this was an unprovoked attack on police officers,” Commissioner O'Neill said during the press briefing around 3:30 a.m. at St. Barnabas Hospital.

Familia died minutes after police brass addressed reporters at around 3:30 a.m., the source said.

Police stationed outside the slain officer’s home south of Van Cortlandt Park told two men that Familia had been killed.

“What happened,” one of the men cried, falling into the other’s arms. “How could this happen?”

Officers with an NYPD anti-crime unit flocked to her partner’s distress call, confronting the fleeing gunman a block from the shooting on Morris Ave. He brandished a silver revolver and police opened fire, killing him, O'Neill said.

He was identified as Alexander Bonds, whose criminal rap sheet includes an assault on a police officer with brass knuckles, a source said.

"Let's be clear. This was nothing less than an assassination of a police officer. Our understanding is she was filling out her memo book and he walked out and fired one round," the source said.

The source said Bonds, who boasts up to six different aliases, recently spoke critically of law enforcement on an unspecified social media site. He said police in Oakland, Calif., were wrong to stop a child riding a bicycle.

An innocent bystander standing next to Bonds was shot in the stomach during the deadly confrontation with police but is in stable condition, police said.

Police said it was not known whose gunfire hit the bystander, who has no connection to the suspect.

Witness Jay Marzelli thought the shots were fireworks at first.

“I was in this bodega right here on Creston, just getting a sandwich and all of a sudden there was all this running and stuff going on and I look out probably 40, 50, 60 cops screaming, ‘Call a paramedic, clear the block!’” he said.

“It looked like there was a riot going on and two seconds later I hear gunshots, ‘bam, bam’ and then the police officer was just lying there in front of the stationary precinct — right here on Creston.”

Hundreds of heavily armed police officers were on the streets surrounding the scene into the early morning hours.

Fireworks periodically lit up the night sky as residents of the Fordham Heights neighborhood continued to celebrate the Fourth of July, undeterred by the massive police presence.

“The city was celebrating our Independence Day. One of those days we look forward to each year. The NYPD did an extraordinary job keeping our city safe ... and tragedy struck,” Mayor de Blasio said, starting off the press conference.

The reports of the pyrotechnics rattled off apartment buildings as NYPD police helicopters circled overhead, their spotlights trained on the area where the mobile command center had been stationed since March.

Streets were shut down for blocks in all directions.

The late night holiday shooting was eerily similar to the assassination of two officers as they sat in their marked police car on a street in Brooklyn in December 2014.

Officers Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos were targeted by a gunman who had posted anti-police messages on his social media feeds in the days before the shooting, officials said at the time.

Police Commissioner James O’Neill is scheduled to conduct a media briefing at St. Barnabas, where cops have about four full blocks closed off on Third Ave., only allowing police vehicles to pass.

“I was driving up 183rd here and cops started running up to me in a hurry screaming 'back up back up,' we drove back in reverse about three blocks,” said Ernesto Martinez Jr., 31, who lives in the neighborhood. “I ran over to the hospital, when I got this way cops started flooding in, man, they’ve just been coming and coming.”

The officer was shot less than two miles away from where Sgt. Paul Tuozzolo was fatally shot by an armed ex-con in November.

A second cop, Sgt. Emmanuel Kwo, suffered a graze wound, but survived that shooting.

WITH LIZ KEOGH